Accueil » Life in France » La Galette des Rois
a traditional 'galette des rois''

La Galette des Rois

French tradition: La galette des rois around France

The Galette des rois (‘king cake’) is a dessert that is traditionally served in French households on 6th January, Epiphany. It is a central part of Christmas cuisine in France, but the ingredients and appearance of this pudding vary greatly across the different regions of the country. In Paris and the north of France, the galette takes the form of a puff pastry tart (a recipe for which can be found HERE) filled with frangipane, while in Provence, the equivalent gâteau des rois is a round brioche cake with a whole in the middle, to make the shape of a wreath or crown. It is decorated with candied fruits and sugar granules, which represent jewels, and can be flavoured with cognac or with orange blossom.

There may be several different recipes for the galette des rois, but they are all united by the traditional idea that the dividing up of the cake will ‘tirer les rois’ (‘draw the kings’) to the Epiphany. In addition, the galettes always contain a single little charm, or fève, that hidden inside. Historically, there really would be a fève (‘broad bean’) inside, but in the 19th century this was replaced by small ornaments or figurines. The person who finds this trinket within their slice will become king or queen for the day, and will have to offer the cake at the following year’s celebration. To ensure a random and fair distribution of the cake shares, it is traditional for the youngest person to place themselves under the table and name the recipient of each piece.

Formerly, the galette would be divided into as many pieces as there were guests, plus one. This final slice was called ‘the share of God’, or ‘the share of the poor’, and would be given to the first poor person who arrived at the door asking for charity.

the 'fèves' in the 'galette des rois'

See also...


See also…


Reviews

“As I got to know the children I was working with- know what they liked and disliked, their hobbies and their sense of humour- working with them and teaching English in France became really enjoyable.”

— Sinead

Accommodation

Accommodation in France - Street Montmartre

Help Settling in

Help Settling In - Suitcases Dog Small

Free Velib Pass

Free Velib Pass - Bicycle in Paris

Transportation

Transportation - Metropolitain Paris Sepia

Our Community

Our Community - Birds Red

Stay connected

Stay Connected - Hello Flowers - Echagne linguistique gratuit

Blog

Help Settling In Bonjour - Life in France

FRENCH CUISINE

French cuisine - Jobs in France - Macaroons

Calendar & Good deals

Calendar & good deals - Fruit Market

Job description

Job description - Workshop

Salary and benefits

Bird - Salary Benefits Apply Flexible hours

Working hours

Flexible Working Hours - Animals Zoom

Our Philosophy

Learn a foreign language - Our Philosophy - Birds Green Background

Learn how to teach

Birds - Learn how to teach

Learn French

Learn French - River Canal

Referral Programme

Work in France - Thank You - Invite your friends

Free guided tours

Free guided tours in Paris - Balloons

Cultural Outings

Cultural Outings - Notre Dame Free Guided Tour

Study in France

Study in France - Tour Eiffel and Carroussel

Free French classes

a picture of swallows

Testimonials

Testimonials - Rocket and Stars

Notre histoire

Notre Histoire - Pieds Enfant

English Speaking Jobs in Paris

English Speaking Jobs in Paris - Place des Vosges - Teaching English

Mardis de Babylangues

Language Exchange - Mardis de Babylangues - Echange Linguistique gratuit

Reviews

Babylangues reviews - English speaking jobs in france

Trips & Excursions

Trips & Excursions - Map of France

French Cinema

French Cinema - Projector Old

French traditions

French traditions - Accordion

English Speaking Jobs in Lyon

Jobs in Lyon - Lyon

Intraduisibles

Intraduisibles - Dictionnaire traduction

Pin It on Pinterest